Dispelling the ‘Bielsa Burnout’ myth

04 Feb 2020 02:05 pm, by YorkshireSquare


It is that time of the season again where pundits who have never managed spout their usual nonsense. Probably having not even watched Leeds play this season apart from maybe the Arsenal match. Earlier we reported on Jamie Redknapp questioning whether Bielsa’s training methods would lead to burnout. But it’s lazy punditry, falling back on the old myths that Bielsa’s teams ‘burnout’. But anyone who watches Leeds will tell you our form isn’t down to burn out, it boils down to one basic thing - not taking chances. No fitness issues, no burnout, no poor squad rotation etc. Put the ball in the net at the appropriate rate for the chances created and all the nonsense talk goes away.

Did Harrison miss a glorious chance because he was tired? Did Costa, Hernandez, Bamford, Klich etc all fail to hit the target due to tiredness? If we were getting over-run by the opposition then yes fitness and burnout are concerns but that hasn't happened this year or last year. We are just suffering as a team because players are panicking in front of goal. That is the only issue so perhaps we should be doing more training on finishing. If we score the three or four goals in a match that we should be doing then we win the title at a canter.




The team wasn’t tired against Sheff Wed or Wigan. If we'd got an equaliser against Wigan then we would probably have absolutely battered them at the end to get a winner. It was more frustration than tiredness that may have lead to us 'looking flat.' If you get to a point in a match where you just feel like you'll never score, as a team, then your energy levels are going to drop - that is human nature rather than any fitness issue. You also then have the additional problem that you might switch off mentally for a split second, whilst feeling sorry for yourself, and suddenly in that split second you make a mistake that leads to a concession of a goal.

As a player you hate matches where you just couldn't see your team scoring. You can dominate the match, miss great chances, the opposition keeper would make great saves etc and you just knew that at some point the opposition would probably score a really scruffy goal and win the game. Leeds just need to start taking their chances again, which they have plenty of. Stick the ball in the back of the net and any talk of burnout goes away.


Content from Weasel from our discussion forums