The Visual/Music Discussion Thread

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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

Post by Dr.Leeds »

white.riot wrote:I demand satisfaction
Your wish Sir, is my command.



I hope you gentlemen can all calm down now. :wink:
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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

Post by barryanorak »

Dr.Leeds wrote:
Unless I am in a beligerent mood I'll always give the patient a choice if I can accommodate their taste. My Opera, Jazz and specialist Old Lady Music selections are very limited.

I've done lists where we have had Verdi, Al Green, Mike Oldfield, Metallica, Elvis and Natalie Imbruglia in a single morning.

Unless you were particularly careful with the 'scope, I do hope you weren't playing 'Torn'.
Music so wishes to be heard that it sometimes calls on unlikely characters to give it voice...

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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

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faaip wrote:
Greenwood Tree it is then, dawn though :( , I already have a duel at twenty five to dawn, with celery sticks so it may take a while
faaip lad, you're an innocent when it comes to f**k music. By invoking the Greenwood Tree, WR is very obviously demanding a duel by concertina, thus this version of "Greenwood Laddie":

Bates, GFH, Cellino: Same s**t, different arseholes.
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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

Post by Dr.Leeds »

barryanorak wrote:
Unless you were particularly careful with the 'scope, I do hope you weren't playing 'Torn'.
Left Of The Middle :wink:
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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

Post by faaip »

Dr.Leeds wrote: Left Of The Middle :wink:
Speaking of Torn , have I posted this here yet ..I have everywhere else :?

21/22 team - Meslier - Ayling - Firpo- Koch - Llorente - Phillips - Dallas - Raphinha - Harrison - Klich - Rodrigo
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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

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Guildford White wrote:
faaip lad, you're an innocent when it comes to f**k music. By invoking the Greenwood Tree, WR is very obviously demanding a duel by concertina, thus this version of "Greenwood Laddie":

ah it will be a short battle if folk is invoked
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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

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faaip wrote: Speaking of Torn , have I posted this here yet ..I have everywhere else :?

I remember nearly wetting myself first time I saw it on TV. Genius.

Always a pleasure to see it again. :-D
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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

Post by becchio bear »

I must say I thought he was a complete tw@t until the lovely Natalie turned up and then I let him off :roll: :bear:
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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

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becchio bear wrote:I must say I thought he was a complete tw@t until the lovely Natalie turned up and then I let him off :roll: :bear:
She is lovely isn't she :luv:
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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

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Dr.Leeds wrote: No disrespect GW but I've yet to find anything that inspires me to put those two words together.

I have wide tastes and an open mind but Jazz does nothing for me. I'll give your uploads a try when I get home though and feed back.
So, what did you reckon doc?
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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

Post by becchio bear »

Dr.Leeds wrote: She is lovely isn't she :luv:
I had tickets to see her many years ago at the Doncaster Dome. I had a really bad ear infection and was on antibiotics but thought I'd soldier on! Met up with my then hubby and went to a pizza place nearby. We came out of there, got back into the car and started to drive to the Dome when all of a sudden I felt really really sick. I grabbed a tartan blanket off the back seat and to my horror completely filled it :oops: Needless to say I wasn't in a fit state to go and see Natalie so had to trundle off home abandoning the blanket enroute :| :bear:
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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

Post by faaip »

speaking of albums of the year, New Grinderman in the fall, - Grinderman 2. Sure that will push the Fall close
21/22 team - Meslier - Ayling - Firpo- Koch - Llorente - Phillips - Dallas - Raphinha - Harrison - Klich - Rodrigo
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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

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Guildford White wrote: So, what did you reckon doc?
A mixed reaction really.

John Coltrane: Not one of my favourite things. Sort of gave me the same feeling as I get when I hear Mariah Carey or Eva Cassidy warbling their way through a tune that was fine as it was. I think the instrument is a tenor sax is it? Not a sound I love I'm afraid.

Miles Davis: Good and soulful and quite enjoyable. Didn't inspire me to go out and buy it but didn't inspire me to retune the wireless.

Jan Garbarek: Struggled with this one a bit and probably wouldn't have finished it but for the fact that I appreciate someone trying to expand my horizons. Nearly provoked the visceral reactions you allude to above.

Keith Jarrett: My favourite of the four, and in retrospect, probably because it is undoubtedly the least "jazzy" of your offerings. Bits of it had me thinking of Elton's "Song For Guy". I'd be quite comfortable with that on the iPod.

To be honest, I've never quite understood why I hate Jazz so much. I love soul, passion and technicality and no-one can accuse Jazz of lacking those. I guess it is a matter of degree. Stick a bit of Ella Fitzgerald or Nina Simone on I'll be happy enough. Anyone who wishes to scat in my general direction had better like the look of themselves with a fat lip.
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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

Post by Gino 1959 »

I've gone back to jazz time and time again - never "get it" - whereas I have an 'affinity' for blues tracks that touch something in my spirt, my soul and my heart. Is it a cultural thing? There is more identification with the blues than jazz in Ireland - there seems to be similarities with the respective struggles associated with the former - and the links between the old blues singer and people like Rory Gallagher is (in my view) indisputable.

To me the jazz genre never defined a people or nation or a cause, which is what I think music should really be about - although I can accept that it is also simply there to be enjoyed. However, I mostly turn to music when I want to be provoked or made to think or have someone more talented than I express what I am feeling in musical form.
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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

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Dr.Leeds wrote: A mixed reaction really.

John Coltrane: Not one of my favourite things. Sort of gave me the same feeling as I get when I hear Mariah Carey or Eva Cassidy warbling their way through a tune that was fine as it was. I think the instrument is a tenor sax is it? Not a sound I love I'm afraid.

Miles Davis: Good and soulful and quite enjoyable. Didn't inspire me to go out and buy it but didn't inspire me to retune the wireless.

Jan Garbarek: Struggled with this one a bit and probably wouldn't have finished it but for the fact that I appreciate someone trying to expand my horizons. Nearly provoked the visceral reactions you allude to above.

Keith Jarrett: My favourite of the four, and in retrospect, probably because it is undoubtedly the least "jazzy" of your offerings. Bits of it had me thinking of Elton's "Song For Guy". I'd be quite comfortable with that on the iPod.

To be honest, I've never quite understood why I hate Jazz so much. I love soul, passion and technicality and no-one can accuse Jazz of lacking those. I guess it is a matter of degree. Stick a bit of Ella Fitzgerald or Nina Simone on I'll be happy enough. Anyone who wishes to scat in my general direction had better like the look of themselves with a fat lip.
Fair enough doc - at least you gave it a try.

If you want me to burn you a copy of the Keith Jarrett I'd be happy to.
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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

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Doc - I truly didn't get jazz until I was in my late 40's. Miles' "Bitches Brew" was about as near as I got, as it was a part of the psychedelic, hippy scene for some reason...but my general impression of jazz was just a horrible cacaphony and "musicians" randomly playing notes with no tune or meaning.
However, driving home to Amsterdam from Hamburg one early morning, after playing a gig there - I was trying to find something decent on the radio that wasn't rock. I came across a jazz station and suddenly everything clicked into place. I was enjoying jazz tunes I'd previously dismissed as a noise....aprreciating the timings and the "colours" in the music.
It was a very inspired drive home.
I guess jazz is something you mature into? I find the sound of a muted trumpet every bit as wonderful as the sound of a rock guitar....tho the most beautiful sound of any instrument in the world is the pedal steel guitar! 8-)

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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

Post by Martyn »

Twiggster wrote:
Doc - I truly didn't get jazz until I was in my late 40's. Miles' "Bitches Brew" was about as near as I got, as it was a part of the psychedelic, hippy scene for some reason...but my general impression of jazz was just a horrible cacaphony and "musicians" randomly playing notes with no tune or meaning.
However, driving home to Amsterdam from Hamburg one early morning, after playing a gig there - I was trying to find something decent on the radio that wasn't rock. I came across a jazz station and suddenly everything clicked into place. I was enjoying jazz tunes I'd previously dismissed as a noise....aprreciating the timings and the "colours" in the music.
It was a very inspired drive home.
I guess jazz is something you mature into? I find the sound of a muted trumpet every bit as wonderful as the sound of a rock guitar....tho the most beautiful sound of any instrument in the world is the pedal steel guitar! 8-)


Strangely, one of the defining moments in my appreciation of jazz also involved driving to Amsterdam (but only from Vinkeveen) in 1985. I heard a piece on Humphrey Littleton's programme on the BBC World Service but didn't catch the name of the artist. In those days there was a specialist jazz music shop near Leidseplein, so I went in there, found the old guy who owned it and hummed the tune to him. Remarkably, given the complete non-musicality of my voice, he recognised it and so my love affair with the music of Jan Garbarek began.
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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

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Guildford White wrote:
Strangely, one of the defining moments in my appreciation of jazz also involved driving to Amsterdam (but only from Vinkeveen) in 1985. I heard a piece on Humphrey Littleton's programme on the BBC World Service but didn't catch the name of the artist. In those days there was a specialist jazz music shop near Leidseplein, so I went in there, found the old guy who owned it and hummed the tune to him. Remarkably, given the complete non-musicality of my voice, he recognised it and so my love affair with the music of Jan Garbarek began.
That jazz shop was still there when I left the 'Dam, 7 years ago. Dunno if the old guy you mention was still working there or even alive, as I only ever saw a bloke in his 30's working there. I used to buy old blues vinyl in there (no cd's in THAT shop!)...and every 30th April he'd have a small stage set up on the street outside and some surprisingly famous Dutch jass and blues artistes would play there for free during the queen's birthday celebrations.

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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

Post by white.riot »

On the - jazz never defined a people or a nation or a cause thing. Maybe this text will change your opinion gino. Much world music is jazz and much jazz is african. Probably the best for me is Ethiopian or Nigerian or South African. South African jazz as played by Abdullah Ibrahim (much of it in exile as a result of apartheid certainly defines a cause as big as any I can think of.

Amazingly I've never been to Amsterdam and uniquely it seems I still love jazz. Maybe if I went to Amsterdam I would begin to understand the attraction of ECM music :wink:

"FREEDOM, RHYTHM AND SOUND: Jazz with a raised fist and a copy of Malcolm X speeches in the other hand!

Few people today -- musicians included -- consider rock or jazz as “political”, even in the broadest sense of the word.

Yet back in the late 60s and through the 70s large areas of both certainly were. Less than a year after that remarkable year 1968 (student demonstrations, assassinations, political oppression and revolutionary activity) the dialogue changed.

Jefferson Airplane who urged you to “feed your head” now shouted “up against the wall, motherfucker”, and John Lennon was ambiguous/ambivalent about revolution: “Don’t you know you can count me out/in”.

Jimi Hendrix, whose exploratory music increasingly stood between improv.rock and free form jazz was being hauled into Black Panther debates because he was black but his audience was predominantly white.

By 1970 Miles Davis was increasingly looking to connect back with a black audience (the Jack Johnson album, then the street funk of On the Corner), and even further out were jazz groups like the Revolutionary Ensemble and the Art Ensemble of Chicago, saxophonist/writer Archie Shepp (“let my notes be bullets”) plus jazz-inspired performers like Amiri Baraka, The Last Poets and Gil Scott-Heron.

In much 70s black jazz, revolutionary political thinking was no subtext: it was in your face in music with titles such as The African Look, Attica Blues (after the prison massacre in California), Chicago (after the riots), The People’s Republic, For the People and so on.

Jazz was freedom music (of expression, if nothing else) and so musicians liberated themselves from the shackles of form and free jazz became a profound and prevalent mode of expression (although it had been around since Ornette Coleman’s Free Jazz album of ‘60). Many musicians also liberated themselves from the legacy of white America slavery and adopted African or Muslim names.

These were exciting, angry and conflicted times -- were the Weathermen and Panthers freedom fighters or terrorists? -- and the jazz reflected it.

In the absence of CD releases of many albums from that period -- most were on small labels out of New York or Europe -- a two CD set Freedom Rhythm and Sound (Soul Jazz) helps fill in this important, and often forgotten, period in jazz.

Subtitled “Revolutionary Jazz and the Civil Rights Movement 1963-83”, these discs cut a wide path through jazz and improvised music and include big names (Sun Ra with his seminal, seven minute Nuclear War, the Art Ensemble of Chicago, Oliver Lake, Archie Shepp with the raging Attica Blues, Horace Tapscott) alongside the likes of Errol Parker, pianist Amina Claudine Myers (too often relegated to a footnote despite being a member of the AACM and work with Shepp and others) and many more.

Just as Gil Scott-Heron would warn the complacent black middle class that “the revolution will not be televised”, so here Gary Bartz NTU Troop says “never will be a revolution while you’re drinkin’ wine” in the woozy, Afrojazz-framed Drinking Song. It was time to get straight and “say it loud, I’m black and I’m proud”.

Eyes and ears here are on Africa (Oliver Lake with NTU on Africa, Arkestra trumpeter Philip Cohran and the Artistic Heritage Ensemble on The African Look) and to more recent music out of New Orleans and slavery days. Black music from the past to the future.

Coinciding with a Gilles Peterson and Stuart Baker book of album cover art of the same name (equally DIY and fiercely independent) -- and including a booklet of period photos -- Freedom Rhythm and Sound collects consciousness raising and politicised jazz which is thrilling and courageous in its anger, soul-funk, assertion and exploratory nature.

Added: 26 Apr 10"

As ever I recommend the amazing soul Jazz record label - without doubt the finest label I know. Everything they release is vital and beautifully packaged [imo]. Treat yourself to some Latin American jazz - wonderful and I reckon linked to a people as much as any music I can think of. Jazz covers such a wide spectrum - doubt if anyone could possibly like it all but most folk could, I think, find something of interest.

Climbs off soap box and nips for a beer and a Joe Meek best of CD.

ps: I don't know what this is (blues/jazz often merge into one for me) but it's an absolutely essential album imo - hope someone enjoys if only in the Netherlands


Last edited by white.riot on Fri Jun 11, 2010 6:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: O/T The Music Discussion Thread

Post by faaip »

one of my favorite movies, not to mention it being Madsens and Johnsons finest work. It's amazing how little I remember of the soundtrack,
but it sounds like a definite purchase and a visit to DVD land for the film cause it's been a while
21/22 team - Meslier - Ayling - Firpo- Koch - Llorente - Phillips - Dallas - Raphinha - Harrison - Klich - Rodrigo
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