What the pundits/press/coaches are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

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What the pundits/press/coaches are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

Post by 1964white »

Mail

Marcelo Bielsa's first trip to England encapsulated the way it has always been with him and football.

He arrived to watch the Euro 96 tournament and fastidiously studied train timetables to be sure that if there were two games played on the same day, he would get to both.

The 65-year-old, whose arrival in the Premier League with Leeds United this weekend provides the season's most compelling new dimension, has spent his professional life applying himself to detail — teams, tactics, opponents — and how they might be applicable to winning matches.

One of his most cherished successes was the Olympic title he clinched for his native Argentina at the 2004 Athens Games, after a gold-medal match against Paraguay that took place in searing heat at 10am. On the day before the final, he went to the Olympic Stadium to observe the position of the sun at that time of the day and whether it would have implications for his players

His unearthing of a young player called Mauricio Pochettino, in a town on the road that runs out to Argentina's Atlantic coast, came during his quest to scout young players for his first club, Newell's Old Boys, in 1987.

He had divided Argentina into blocks of 50 square miles, staged tournaments in every one and yet still asked a local coach in a one-horse town if there was talent his system might have missed.

Pochettino, to this day one of Bielsa's most ardent devotees, was mentioned. So Bielsa set off on the road known as Route 33 in his battered white Fiat 147.

His obsession with football's details can take him into the realms of the ridiculous. He turned up by invitation at the wedding of one of his strikers, Martin Posse, with a stack of the groom's match videos for him to peruse.

In one discussion of his Christmas plans, while between jobs, he declared an intention to do two hours of physical exercise each day and spend 14 hours watching football videos. Videos have always been a huge part of his life.

So many of these details tumble out of Tim Rich's excellent new biography of the man, The Quality of Madness, though the book also encourages a revision of the nickname El Loco (the madman), which he has carried through a 30-year career as a coach at South American clubs, the Argentina and Chile national sides, Athletic Bilbao and Marseille, to name a few.

'It translates as passionate and obsessive,' says Raul Gamez, who knew him from the late 1990s at Argentine club Velez Sarsfield. That's where Bielsa would put a mattress down at the back of a van and lie watching games on video, while one of his staff drove him back from away games.

But what makes this relentless, indefatigable, sometimes bizarre manager such a compelling figure is the extraordinary devotion he attracts from those who have played for him.

Players love him because he makes them — drives them — to play better, think smarter and see the game in a new dimension. There are few better examples than Kalvin Phillips, Bielsa's captain at Leeds, whose potential had come to almost nothing.

Bielsa could not comprehend why Phillips was considered a forward when he looked like he would hold midfield well. He was promptly redeployed as a critical part of Leeds' relentless pressing unit and on Tuesday made his England debut.

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'He looked like a manager you don't really want to upset when he told me what he wanted me to do,' says Phillips, who returned to Leeds on Thursday to present his first England shirt to Bielsa.

'It was, "Lose weight, learn how to play centre back and in central defensive midfield". It has changed everything. My improvements, my progression. They're all down to him.'

Pochettino describes precisely the same effect, despite training sessions when Bielsa arrived at Espanyol which began at 7.45am followed by breakfast and 90 minutes of gym work. 'He woke me from a period of lethargy. I was too much in my comfort zone — lost but I did not know it,' he says.

Bielsa brings to the Premier League a form of total football in which no player is fixed to one position, midfielders are frequently deployed to defence and the football is fast, furious, instinctive and sometimes overwhelming.

The Argentine's intellect has not always been the easiest fit with his chosen sport.

One of the many legends, which seem to reside in the space between fact and fiction, tells of him using a thesaurus to find words of few syllables because his erudition has left a dressing room blank. On one occasion, he just scribbled where he wanted the ball to be played on defender Fernando Gamboa's boots.

'All I could think of was how he was ruining my boots,' Gamboa told Roman Iucht, an Argentine writer.

Even his self-assessments can be highly complex. As one observer put it: 'He does not just feel. He analyses the feeling.'

A national newspaper's perfectly reasonable characterisation of him as garrulous back in February provoked an indignant, prickly, 20-minute monologue at his next press conference — in Spanish as always — on why he had said so much the previous time.

He can be thin-skinned, so there could be fireworks this season. He has everything that is written about him and his team translated into Spanish and he reads every word.

The subject most likely to elicit a negative reaction is his teams' capacity to self-combust in the final weeks of the season, which provides some explanation as to why he has not won a domestic trophy for 20 years. This is a blind spot.

'I cannot lie to you. In the final months we couldn't even move,' Ander Herrera said in 2012 after Athletic Bilbao had blown chances to win the Europa League and Spanish Cup.

'Our legs said, "Stop". We always used to play with the same players and we were not at our best in the finals. To be honest, we were physically f****d. We couldn't run any more.'

Some in Argentina question also whether Bielsa's single-minded approach to a style of football makes his teams too readable.

Critics willing to put a name to their thoughts are thin on the ground. 'He had no alternatives, no different ideas. Teams could read his team. Everyone knew what they had to do,' one source recalls of Bielsa's Argentina side at the 2002 World Cup. They were eliminated at the group stage after defeat by England, leaving a then 46-year-old Bielsa weeping in the dressing room.

Whether he is willing to adapt his system for the task in hand is one of the most fascinating aspects of what lies ahead.

Graeme Souness has already suggested that playing out from the back against Liverpool, in the usual Bielsa style, could be perilous at Anfield on Saturday.

'I would try to plant a seed. I'm not going to do that all of the time because they thrive on closing you down and do it so well,' Souness said. 'You need to mix it up.'

Eddie Gray has his doubts. 'He researches the opposition exceptionally,' Gray says. 'He'll have dossiers on them all. But he'll play his own way.'

Whatever the uncertainties, Bielsa brings something quite sublime — a transparent, unspun approach to management which runs against the game's slick and superficial modern gloss.

He'll continue to leave the flat he has made home, above a sweet shop in Wetherby. He'll continue to arrive at Leeds' Thorp Arch training ground in the passenger seat of a second-hand VW Golf.

He'll continue to smile at the Bielsa Rhapsody the fans sing — 'Open your eyes, look up to the skies, we're Leeds' — while quite possibly having no clue what it's all about. And he'll continue to run what they have come to know at the training ground as 'Murderball': the remorseless, non-stop, full-throttle practice matches which run for as long as he deems necessary. Bielsa, says Leeds' featherweight world champion Josh Warrington, is the epitome of what this club have always represented.

And because of the humility, authenticity and commitment he brings, his players will run through the walls he puts before them. 'Conviction is a basic element of being a manager,' he once said. 'If I am not convinced, then I don't convince anyone else.

'And if I don't talk with a sparkle in my voice, I don't get people around me. And if I don't get those people, I don't get support for a project that demands blood.'
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Re: What the pundits/press are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

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They got the Captain's role wrong although I have no doubt Kalvin will be our next leader
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Re: What the pundits/press are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

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Peter Crouch

"My first game out of the Premier League with Stoke in August 2018 was at Elland Road. We turned up thinking we would be fine but ended up being run all over by Leeds in Marcelo Bielsa’s English debut game.

I remember at one point saying to myself: ‘Who the **** are these?!’ They were brilliant, full of energy and intensity. Bielsa is a class act, his name and reputation known the world over.

He has given the people of Leeds the thing they have craved for 16 years and they will be one of the stories of the season. I believe they will comfortably stay up and can see them taking a couple of big scalps"

Marcelo Bielsa
The eccentric Argentinian's breathless style of football will be a welcome addition to the Premier League but will it work against the big boys?

KEY PLAYER - Kalvin Phillips

The 24-year-old has flourished under Bielsa and was the Championship’s best midfielder last season. Has since been rewarded with an England call-up.
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Re: What the pundits/press are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

Post by whiteswan »

Excellent read Leon, I love that man. Must buy the new biography.
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Re: What the pundits/press are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

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Who will be the surprise package

MICAH RICHARDS: Leeds! Leeds! Leeds! I know there is a feeling that my local club will either finish in the top seven or get relegated but I am saying they will be nearer the first part of that prediction.

They might not have a lot of household names but there is one thing you know about going to Elland Road and that is it's a horrible experience for the away team. It's ingrained into Leeds players that they have to work hard and with Marcelo Bielsa, the genius they have as manager, I'm sure they will be fine.

CHRIS SUTTON: Sheffield United made mugs of us all last season. That's what Leeds, West Brom and Fulham — our three new additions from the Championship — have to aspire to as well.

I'd particularly love to see Leeds hold their own in the Premier League by playing the game their way — the Marcelo Bielsa way, with all the swagger and style they showed in 2019-20.

How will Leeds fare on their return to the big time?

MICAH RICHARDS: I think it will work perfectly. Leeds create chances and score lots of goals and I don't believe they will lose any of their potency at a higher level. I like the signing of Rodrigo and if he fires, the team will fire.

CHRIS SUTTON: Leeds play in an extremely positive way with plenty of energy. They like to keep the ball — no Championship club averaged a higher possession than their 64.25 per cent last season. But that style does have its dangers, especially at this level.

Premier League clubs can punish you if you aren't up to it. Let's see if they can do a Sheffield United, or if they join the long list of clubs who made it to the Premier League only to be sent straight back.

MARTIN KEOWN: The list of managers who have expressed admiration for Bielsa is a long one. It's a who's who of big football names. Pep Guardiola says he is the 'best coach in the world'. Mauricio Pochettino says he is a 'genius'. Diego Simeone says of all the coaches who influenced him, he 'taught me the most'. It goes on and on.

I suspect we will see Bielsa look to impose his style on his opponents, rather than try to react to the way they play. He is a professor of football who will want to make his mark on the Premier League.

Chris Wilder's Sheffield United can act as inspiration after the way they handled last season. It's good to see Leeds back in the big time. It's long overdue.
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Re: What the pundits/press are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

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whiteswan wrote: Fri Sep 11, 2020 10:17 am Excellent read Leon, I love that man. Must buy the new biography.
Just great to see LEEDS UNITED all over the back pages

Brilliant article as you say Swannie
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Re: What the pundits/press are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

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whiteswan wrote: Fri Sep 11, 2020 10:17 am Excellent read Leon, I love that man. Must buy the new biography.
Finished it last week.

Favourite bit was when the President if Chile turned up to congratulate the team on qualifying for the World Cup finals,

The team had to be rushed back overnight from where they had qualified in a match in Colombia to be at their training ground in the mountains. ( Where of course Marcello had redesigned, had rebuilt and then made the place his home) They had all to be dressed in their kit and ready for 8am the next morning.

The President and her entourage show up, the President of the Chilean FA are all there, the squad is all there, there is great fanfare, but of course no sign of Marcello..

Next he appears with two men no-one knew, security gets twitchy, who are these guys?

Marcello introduces them to the President. To paraphrase. "This is the man who bakes us fresh bread every day, and this man brings to the camp fresh fruit and veg, without them we would not have qualified for the World Cup"

Lovely book.
'We can wait for the next game with serenity'

'I am quite clear in my mind that one has to feel sincere love for those he leads, and if he doesn't feel it naturally, then he must learn how to feel it' Marcelo Bielsa


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Re: What the pundits/press are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

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Don't often take much notice of so called pundits as most of them just do a sound bite for a quick pay off - Danny Mills, Darren Bent and co.

But I really like Crouchy, listen to his podcast he's a bit of a joker but speaks from the heart about what he knows, he watches a lot of football and IMO is spot on with a lot of his comments on the state of football, players and teams so I'm really pleased he rates us :tup: :tup: :tup:
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Re: What the pundits/press are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

Post by HarryofOz »

Some very positive commens, nice to read. Thanks Leon.
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Re: What the pundits/press are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

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Ratscoot wrote: Fri Sep 11, 2020 10:41 am Don't often take much notice of so called pundits as most of them just do a sound bite for a quick pay off - Danny Mills, Darren Bent and co.

But I really like Crouchy, listen to his podcast he's a bit of a joker but speaks from the heart about what he knows, he watches a lot of football and IMO is spot on with a lot of his comments on the state of football, players and teams so I'm really pleased he rates us :tup: :tup: :tup:
Crouch made me laugh with this comment Rat

I remember at one point saying to myself: ‘Who the **** are these?!’ They were brilliant, full of energy and intensity.
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Re: What the pundits/press are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

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HarryofOz wrote: Fri Sep 11, 2020 10:50 am Some very positive comments, nice to read. Thanks Leon.
I'm loving the positivity Harry :)
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Re: What the pundits/press are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

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Irish Ian wrote: Fri Sep 11, 2020 10:29 am Finished it last week.

Favourite bit was when the President if Chile turned up to congratulate the team on qualifying for the World Cup finals,

The team had to be rushed back overnight from where they had qualified in a match in Colombia to be at their training ground in the mountains. ( Where of course Marcello had redesigned, had rebuilt and then made the place his home) They had all to be dressed in their kit and ready for 8am the next morning.

The President and her entourage show up, the President of the Chilean FA are all there, the squad is all there, there is great fanfare, but of course no sign of Marcello..

Next he appears with two men no-one knew, security gets twitchy, who are these guys?

Marcello introduces them to the President. To paraphrase. "This is the man who bakes us fresh bread every day, and this man brings to the camp fresh fruit and veg, without them we would not have qualified for the World Cup"

Lovely book.
Brilliant Ian

The man is unique 8-)
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Re: What the pundits/press are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

Post by billysboots »

Great stuff!
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Re: What the pundits/press are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

Post by Smudge3920 »

I do most of my reading in the winter months here in the colonies, well -35c can deter you going out at times... this one is definitely on my reading list for this winter, thanks for the insight "64 just moved to #1 to be read... excellent post '64, some wonderful comments.
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Re: What the pundits/press are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

Post by Finnatic »

Don’t know if this should go here as it’s not a pundit or press, it’s from Jurgen Klopp.
Praise indeed!

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Re: What the pundits/press are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

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Finnatic wrote: Fri Sep 11, 2020 3:41 pm Don’t know if this should go here as it’s not a pundit or press, it’s from Jurgen Klopp.
Praise indeed!

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Just fine Finn, I have amended the topic header
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Re: What the pundits/press/coaches are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

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The Telegraph

One of the highlights of the last two years in English football was Marcelo Bielsa’s PowerPoint presentation explaining why he spied on Derby County.

As if it was not enough that the Leeds manager would go to the extraordinary length of sending an intern to a rivals’ training ground with a pair of binoculars to gather an additional piece of information about team news, he then had the ballsiness to not only confirm the story, but call a press conference and deliver a slideshow during which he gave what amounted to a lecture on the different tactical set-ups of Championship clubs, upsetting his rival coaches even more!

“So that’s why they call him ‘The Crazy One ('El Loco'),” I thought. “I cannot wait to see this fella in the Premier League!” While others took offence and rushed to the moral high ground citing gamesmanship and cheating – all fair comment – I loved it. The irrationality and silliness of it enthralled me as much as the revelation of how far Bielsa would go to win a game. Here was a manager already with enough video and statistical data on his opponent to fill a library, and he still couldn’t sleep soundly unless he knew whether Harry Wilson was going to be fit to face his side?

That kind of obsession about football chimes with me. I would never agree with crossing the boundaries to be successful, of course, but I am fully on board with pushing them to their limit to get a result.

In that notorious incident, Bielsa confirmed his addiction to winning borders on the manic. And yet the same manager won the 2019 Fifa Fair Play Award for allowing Aston Villa to score unchallenged after Leeds went ahead with an opponent needing treatment for injury. These contradictions add to his intrigue.

Those who have followed Bielsa’s career knew this already. I am not sure if the right word to describe him is ‘crazy’, or if it is more accurate to see him as quirky. Anyone who spends 90 minutes sitting on a bucket is certainly different, and those idiosyncrasies will ensure Leeds will be the most observed team among neutrals this season. I cannot wait to see how Bielsa goes about reestablishing the club in its natural home, the top tier of English football.

Leeds will not follow the path of most promoted clubs, going into matches to defend deep and play on the counter-attack. Bielsa will try to impose his possession-based style in every game, including against the champions at Anfield on Sunday. Leeds were one of the hardest working in English football last season, allowing Championship opponents less time on the ball than any Premier League team managed in 2019-20.

It remains to be seen if it is brave or naive to attempt to beat Klopp’s Liverpool by outpassing them, but I am sure Bielsa will stick to his principles. Might that be too idealistic? That may be clearer by Saturday night. A year ago, I imagine Klopp was content when the fixture list presented an opening day home game with the recently promoted championship winners, Norwich City. This year I expect he thinks it a nightmare first match, given Bielsa’s sides are known for their quick start to campaigns prior to losing energy in the second half of the season.

Last year they won 12 of their last 14 games – possibly helped by the enforced break during lockdown – but his players have previously complained about fatigue in April and May.

There was something else about the ‘spygate’ drama that stuck with me. Some managers are influencers. Some managers are legends because they are winners. A select few are both. But what separates all of them from the chasing pack is their attention to detail.

Go through any interview from a player praising an elite coach and this is a common thread. We like to picture our managers in their office with assistants and scouts, sifting through hours of video footage, making notes and formulating a tactical strategy to collect three points the following weekend, seeing winning football matches as a great intellectual as much as athletic endeavour. We think of all the best modern coaches in this way - Guardiola, Klopp and Jose Mourinho, especially.

Bielsa captures the imagination because, even when compared to his far more successful contemporaries, he has taken this to such an extreme that even Guardiola said he stands alone.

Klopp agreed. “When I came in, I didn’t see 51 games of Liverpool, to be honest,” he said, referencing how many Leeds matches Bielsa watched prior to taking charge in Yorkshire.

As a coach, Bielsa has built his extraordinary reputation for his style more than an ability to win silverware. He has taken pleasure from rebuilding the identity of clubs such as Athletic Bilbao, Marseille and now Leeds, rather than take over those already at the top where a side is ready-made, primed to compete for titles.

He was successful in Argentina where he won three league titles, and also won Olympic Gold managing the country in 2004. But the 2020 Championship title was his first club honour since 1998, Bielsa previously speaking disparagingly of "the tyranny of trophies". No matter how respectful some of his highest profile opponents are this season, their egos will not tolerate the idea of a coach who has won so little being name-checked as having more impact than them on the modern game. It is another curious contradiction that many players and coaches have suggested Bielsa is a more influential coach than, say, Mourinho. Based on their list of honours, that strikes me as a contentious perspective.

It is also a valid to ask how playing down the importance of winning trophies fits with the idea of spying on opponents? What attracts me to Bielsa, as he has already shown in two years at Leeds, is he will do anything to win. That is an attitude he has communicated to players wherever he has been, including once asking one of them if he was prepared to cut off his finger to win a local derby.

I remember reading the speech he gave to Bilbao’s players after they lost the Europa League final in 2012. “The entire journey to the final was extraordinary, because you played extraordinary games, truly extraordinary. But the way we lost casts a shadow on that,” he said.

These are not the words of a manager who does not equate development with on-field success. At the highest level, the two must be inseparable.

Bielsa walked out at Marseilles after a defeat on the opening day of the season in 2015, citing a loss of trust with his owner. At Lazio, he resigned after two days in 2016, claiming the board had failed to meet a deadline to sign his transfer targets.

Given his volatile history at previous clubs, nobody – not even the Leeds owners – can be entirely sure what Bielsa will say or do no next. In a league where positive results will not be so frequent, and there are sure to be setbacks, that makes events at Elland Road even more exciting. The fact Bielsa only confirmed he signed a contract to stay at the club this season two days before it started underlines that.

I do not believe for one second the summit of Bielsa’s ambition this season is to keep Leeds up. Lionel Messi’s decision to stay at Barcelona denied us the chance to see the most exciting player to ever work in the Premier League. In his compatriot Bielsa, we instead welcome one of the most watchable managers.
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Re: What the pundits/press/coaches are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

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Promoting MOTD prior the BBC News

Gary Lineker

We possibly have the best opening game since the intervention of the Premier League
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Re: What the pundits/press/coaches are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

Post by Cjay »

Good old xenophobia :roll:
Well played Graham :)

MB DOES speak English random journo nobody has ever heard of ( KP said so).

He just doesnt want his words twisted by idiots like you or his way of speaking English mocked by xenophobic morons like you

Also A hack- a person who produces mediocre literary or journalistic work

And you are proud to put that in your bio?
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Re: What the pundits/press/coaches are saying about Bielsa's Leeds

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Oliver Holt

If Leeds keep playing like this. they will stay up with ease & they will get us off our seats in the process.

This match was pure escapism, it was football at it's best & that was because Leeds were not afraid.

Once they were called Dirty Leeds, not any more!
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